Speaking “Seashell” Means Delving Into the Life of Mollusks

In my Florida life, a seashell was a seashell.  Some were prettier than others, some were larger and I just called them shells and never knew they were actually mollusks.  In fact, when I found a nice shell, I never gave much thought to what had once lived inside. Now I have learned to speak…

The Scotch Bonnet Seashell

The Scotch Bonnet seashell (Phalium granulatum) is a member of the helmet shell family and although some of the helmets can be quite large, the Scotch Bonnet is usually no larger than 3-4 inches.  It’s a whitish shell with rows of squarish spots that are tan or caramel colored which looks like a checker board. …

Classifying Seashells

I am not in love with science.  I call my shells by their common names and pay little attention to the Latin names and don’t really care which “family” they belong to, but I realize that some people might. So this is my attempt to explain the classification of seashells, beginning with the “Class”. The…

The Alphabet Cone Shell

Cone shells are fairly small shells that are shaped like – can you imagine? – a cone.  Think of a pointed ice cream cone – a sugar cone – without an opening for the ice cream.  Instead you will see a tight, fairly flattened spiral. They can be found all along the coast of Florida…

The Red Abalone

Abalones live where the rocks are, near shore or sometimes in quite deep water, and move around on a large, muscular foot.  This is the best reason I can think of for not finding them in Florida – not many rocks.  I’ve never seen one here, nor are they mentioned in my seashell ID book….